H-1B and Computer Consulting Company

By | Business Immigration, CIS, Citizenship and Naturalization, H1-B, Uncategorized | No Comments

H-1B lottery is upon us again. This post will deal with some common Request for Evidences for H-1Bs for computer professionals.
Let’s start by saying that the government hates Computer Consulting Company, and they in turn do commit the most amount of fraud. But measures to shore up the H-1B should come from Congress. The Citizenship and Immigration Service as an agency cannot act on its own and impose restrictions that violate the rule of law. Add to that the fact that many senior managers at all agencies have quit, and officers are left to adjudicate on their own, giving birth to a disaster. There is no rhyme or reason why Citizenship and Immigration Service makes things up, and why officers adjudicate however way they feel like.
A couple of years ago, the Citizenship and Immigration Service decreed that the title of “Computer Programmer” is not a specialty one. Even though the requirement of a Computer professional is the same as Systems Analyst, software engineer, software developer. Now they don’t like Computer Programmer and Systems Analyst.
As many of you know, new H-1Bs are filed on March 31, to reach the Citizenship and Immigration Service office on April 1. The Citizenship and Immigration Service made an ultra vires declaration on March 31, 2017 that level 1 job for computer professionals, and computer professionals only, are not “Specialized” jobs. In 2010, Citizenship and Immigration Service had held that a petitioner must “control” employees. When challenged by an ex-Congressman, now an attorney who represent nurses and wrote the H-1B law, the Citizenship and Immigration Service selective applies this control doctrine only to Computer professionals.
The Citizenship and Immigration Service also routinely denies cases on the ground that the Computer job is “vague, non specific, and not specialized.” You can give them a 10 page detailed job description, they come back with form denials, which they copy and paste. How do officers judge that a certain job, which they presumably do not understand is “vague” ? Even with expert opinions, the Citizenship and Immigration Service claims, “we don’t have to take expert advice. We can tell that this is a vague description.” These officers earn less than computer professionals. Why they stick to their Government jobs is beyond me.
As I started by saying, there is fraud in the dealings of the computer consulting that has to be remedied. But this is not the way to do it. Because after all it is our freedom that the government guarantees in our Constitution. This will only lead to a slippery slope, whereby other agencies will also make law themselves, until we cease to be a democracy.

For more information contact Banerjee & Associates

Supreme Court Denies Trump Administration Expedited Appeal – Delays DACA Termination

By | CIS, DACA, Executive Order, Immigration, Immigration Reform, SCOTUS, trump | No Comments

Today, the Supreme Court denied the Trump administration’s request for an expedited judicial appeal, in an attempt to bypass the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals while appealing a lower Federal District Court’s ruling that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program must continue to accept renewal applications during the appeals process. What it means is that the Supreme Court wants DACA to wind its way through the legal process before tackling this issue. We predict that it will take at least 1.5 years to go through. By then, we hope that Congress will get a comprehensive Immigration bill passed. Until such time, the Citizenship and Immigration Service will continue to accept and approve DACA application.

Last September, President Trump originally ordered DACA to end on March 5, 2018, but on January 10, 2018, California Federal District Judge William Alsup temporarily blocked the Trump administration’s efforts to end DACA, and ordered the administration to resume receiving DACA renewal applications.

Now, if President Trump wishes to continue its appeal of Judge Alsup’s ruling, it must first file an appeal with Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, traditionally a liberal leaning court that is likely to deny Trump’s appeal.  Once that denial is issued, then President Trump may resume its appeal to the Supreme Court.  However, even then, the Supreme Court is under no obligation to  grant certiori, meaning it would agree to hear the Trump administration’s appeal.  All these appeal steps will take time, from a year to a year and a half.

While these sets of appeals are taking place, the lower court ruling by Judge Alsup forcing the Department of Homeland Security to continue to accept DACA renewals still stands.  Thus, DACA recipients (“Dreamers”) can continue to renew their work permits under DACA.  More importantly, it buys time for Congress and the President to hopefully find a resolution to allow the nearly 700.000 Dreamers to permanently remain in the United States.

For more information, contact Banerjee & Associates

Must “Dreamers” begin to leave the U.S. once DACA expires on March 5, 2018?

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Highly doubtful. Undocumented immigrants who qualified for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program will likely be able to legally remain in the U.S. until June 2018 at the earliest.

Last September, President Trump directed the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to begin denying renewal of DACA permits on March 5, 2018. DACA protects young undocumented immigrants (“Dreamers”) who came to the US as children from deportation.  On Sept 8, the University of California sued DHS on behalf of approximately 4,000 Dreamer students, asserting that administrative procedures were improperly followed.  On January 10, 2018, California Federal District Judge William Alsup temporarily blocked the Trump administration’s efforts to end DACA, and ordered the administration to resume receiving DACA renewal applications.  On January 18, President Trump appealed Judge Alsup’s ruling directly to the Supreme Court, bypassing the traditional appeals route through the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.

Today, the Supreme Court is deciding whether to take up the President’s appeal.  If the Supreme Court grants certiori and accepts the case, then the earliest rulings would come down this June.  If the Supreme Court declines to the hear the case, President Trump’s appeal would have to be heard first by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.  Since the lower court’s ruling blocking the President’s order will stand in either case, the earliest date for termination of DACA has been extended at least until June 2018.

DACA Background
President Barack Obama’s DACA executive action allowed undocumented immigrants under the age of 16 who came to the US to apply for protection from deportation. Those individuals must then pass a background check in order to get two-year renewal permits to study and work in the U.S.

Approximately 700,000 Dreamers were actively protected by DACA last September, when the Trump administration ordered the DACA program to end.  Applicants must have arrived in the US before 16 years of age and residing in the US since June 15, 2007 in order to be eligible.  When the DHS enacted the DACA policy in 2012, participants cannot have been older than 30.

For more information, contact Banerjee & Associates

A Very Republican solution to DACA/DAPA

By | Business Immigration, DACA, DAPA, Houston Immigration, Immigration, Immigration Policy, Uncategorized | No Comments

Let me be completely honest with you—-I am not an emotional person. I am hard on everyone and operate on pure logic. So I am not going to argue that folks bought here illegally or entered illegally cannot assimilate into their home country. If Americans of any race can live in Mexico, so can they. I am not a bleeding-heart democrat nor am I an evangelical, looking for extra followers for my religion. What I say is just the rational thing to do.

Very few people come to the USA without papers, looking for something illegal to do. They come here because they find work in the US, rather than in their country of origin. If they did not get jobs, they would go back to their home country, simply because cost of living is higher in US. So we depend on them to clean our houses, cut our grass, etc. I pay about $22/hr per person to clean my house. I am willing to pay more. But I want to come home to a clean house. I had some American maids, but their quality of work was poor and in fact horrible in comparison to what I get from the undocumented workers. American Citizens simply don’t work hard.
If I wanted a foreign nanny, I could get an Au pair. But there are NO visa categories for maids, cooks, gardeners, construction workers. There are limited quantity of fruit pickers and restaurant workers. On a side note, it is important to note that when there was a waiter shortage in Mar A Lago, the number of H-2Bs were increased just to accommodate that shortage.

The immigrants working here with no visas, should be given visas because (1) They have a job; (2) They need to pay taxes. Although many do pay taxes, they don’t have to. Would anyone pay taxes if they did not have to? (3) they need to get auto and health insurance. Otherwise they are just draining our resources.
The undocumented came here to work. They do not need Asylum, or Family Immigration (or the recent term coined by the current administration being “chain” migration.) They work. So unless the US can give us citizens who can construct our houses, clean them, care for our lawns, they have to create visa categories for these types of jobs. If Mar A Lago needs foreign waiters, we need foreign workers to do these jobs. If you create sufficient number of these visa categories and folks still come in undocumented, then yes, call them illegal.

For more information call Banerjee & Associates