Houston Immigration Lawyer Looks at the Ever Varied Immigrant Experience

By February 23, 2011News & Press

When most Americans think of immigrants, they think of Mexicans or Latinos because of the latest Arizona anti-immigration laws and the anti-immigration sentiment that is running through the fabric of the country. However, the immigrant experience actually runs the gamut as they come from all over the world.

But imagine every imaginable variable thrown into the spoke of a bicycle wheel. That is how far and wide the human drama continues as the stories of each complex and unique immigration story develops. Heartbreaking stories, such as the one about an uninsured immigrant in California, have been featured in places like the New American Media website. The woman, having learned that she has breast cancer, will be battling the disease alone, because she is alone in the United States – her family in another country can’t be by her side when they desperately want to.

And how about the Filipina, who after having arranged to meet her longtime boyfriend, gets stranded at the airport because she fell suddenly ill and had to be hospitalized because of a colitis flare-up? Her fiancé now cannot help her come down to see him. Stranded and all alone, she is forced to go back. Not knowing how or why, nor reason or rhyme.

“The immigrant experience is not just the undocumented migrant farm worker but encompasses many cultures from many walks of life, and affects the lives of these men, women and children in ways most of us can’t even fathom,” said Annie Bannerjee, an immigration lawyer at The Law Offices of Annie Banerjee in Houston.

There are many ways illegal immigrants come into the country that are not the stereotypical crossing-the-border over-the-Rio Grande, or floating on a small boat floating haphazardly from Cuba. There are a myriad of horror stories. It is a wonder how they even survive. Some involve women and children without anything to their name and no affiliations to call upon.

Sometimes people make their way by being lured and connived by someone promising a way to get here and then find themselves slaving away in a sweatshop, not knowing where they are, having no one to speak to, having no money in their pockets. Stranded. There are stories about a sex-worker who was trucked in by a human trafficker and forced to perform acts not of her will.

What do most immigrants have in common? It is the dream for having a better tomorrow, which is a common human trait and a fundamental human right.

To learn more, visit Visatous.com.